Litecoin is pumping just in time for Valentine’s Day. Is it time to sell $LTC and take profits?

Charlie Lee sold his Litecoin for profit at it’s all time high in December. Now might be a good time for you to take some profits too.

Some of you out there reading this might be thinking, “WHAT? It’s only half of it’s all time high price!” But the truth is.. we are at the All-Time-High again right now.. in Bitcoin value.

As you can see in the 1st chart below in the LTC/USD pair, we hit an All-Time-High over $360 in Mid-December, selling off down lower than the $180 we are at today.

However, when you look at the 2nd chart in the LTC/BTC pair, we can see that we hit a new all-time high today in the Bitcoin value of Litecoin, over 0.02 BTC.

Perhaps some people are FOMOing into Litecoin because of the upcoming Litecoin Cash hard fork. Maybe some people of the weak hands are buying back in on coinbase and want more Litecoin while it’s cheap.

Maybe Facebook and other rumored partnerships will come to fruition one day, along with the lightning network, atomic swaps, partnerships with Monero, and much more. Only time will tell.

Until then, we still need to call profit taking opportunities when we see them. The historical price of LTC in BTC has ranged between 0.008 and 0.02 BTC for the past 10 months indicated by the yellow lines in the chart below.

ltcbtc

Using this medium-term analysis on LTC, it’s definitely a good time today to take some profits into Bitcoin; or just HODL. This is not financial advice.

 

The first Litecoin hard fork “Litecoin Cash” (LCC) – Is it worth FOMOing over?

Litecoin Cash: What is it?Image result for litecoin cash fork

An unofficial hard fork of Litecoin, which is basically a clone cryptocurrency which forks off the Litecoin blockchain.

Why “unofficial”? Well.. because Litecoin’s founder, Charlie Lee says so:

charlieleelitecoincash.PNG

A new cryptocurrency named “Litecoin Cash” (LCC) will fork from the Litecoin blockchain at block 1371111
https://live.blockcypher.com/ltc/

Everyone holding Litecoin will get 10 Litecoin Cash (LCC) for every Litecoin they own.
The Max Supply for Litecoin Cash will be 840 Million compared to Litecoin’s 84 Million, which is why the claim ratio is 10:1
Although Litecoin is mined with Scrpt, Litecoin Cash witll use the SHA256 hashing algorithm.
This is being promoted by Litecoin Cash as a way to extend the life of older Bitcoin mining hardware which is no longer powerful enough to mine Bitcoin.
Since the difficulty of Litecoin Cash will be much lower, it will put less effective SHA256 mining hardware to better use.

Compared to Litecoin, Litcoin Cash also features superior mining difficulty adjustment using the DarkGravity algorithm which is also used by Dash.
This should be considered a “Friendly Fork” because the network will use a new address prefix, unlike Bitcoin Cash did with Bitcoin, which caused much confusion.

How do you get it?
The block of the fork, 1371111, is expected occur sometime between February 18th and 19th so you must be holding Litecoin when this block is confirmed.

Firstly, before getting deeper into how to get the fork, here are some IMPORTANT DISCAIMERS to keep your Litecoin safe.
1) Wait for the fork before doing anything
2) Move your Litecoin to a new address after the fork
3) Use the private key for your old Litecoin address to claim your Litecoin Cash

How to get Litecoin Cash:
1) Download a wallet for your device directly from the official Litecoin Cash website: https://litecoinca.sh/
2) Import your Litecoin private key
3) Claim your Litecoin Cash

Is it legit or a scam?
Although they promote safety measures in order to claim it such as moving your Litecoin before pasting old private keys on the internet, it seems a bit on the scammy side. Charlie Lee’s tweet does explicitly state that anything claiming to be a Litecoin hard fork is a scam.

However, whether Litecoin Cash proves to be a scam or worthless for that matter, if you follow the “Safety Rules” as you claim the fork, there is no risk of losing your coins or being scammed as long as you make sure to never again use the Litecoin address you input to claim the Litecoin Cash fork.

What does it mean for the future of Litecoin?

Image result for litecoin future

This Litecoin Cash hard fork and any other similar hard forks which are developed by members outside of the Litecoin core developer group will have a very minimal impact on the future outlook of Litecoin, if at all.
The most likely outcome for this fork should be very similar to Bitcoing Gold, otherwise known as Bgold.

Image result for bitcoin gold make bitcoin
There are a couple reasons why Bitcoin Gold is our best proxy to benchmark our expectations for Bitcoin Cash.
1) Bitcoin Gold’s main points of differentiation vs. Bitcoin are also the mining algorithm and faster difficulty adjustments
2) Bitcoin Gold’s development team is also a small group in China presenting a friendly fork in order to make better use of certain mining equipment
3) They both have bad English, bad Marketing, and made forking announcements on short timelines to push hype and a sense of urgency to receive the fork.

Currently, Bitcoin Gold is trading around 1.5% the price of Bitcoin. I would expect a similar outcome for Litecoin Cash, although in Litecoin Cash’s case, it may be more like 0.15%, due to the 10-1 claim ratio of the fork and higher Max Supply

With all this said.. let’s get back to the point. Is Litecoin Cash worth FOMOing over?
The answer to that question depends how much skin you have in the game, whether this is something to FOMO over, or even to bother with claiming.
For example, If you are the owner of 100 LTC, currently valued around $15K USD, the Litecoin Cash fork could possibly reward you with a couple hundred dollars worth of coin. You could hold them and see what happens, or even sell them and use them to increase your Litecoin holdings.

However, if you’re only holding a small number of LTC, for example 5, this fork may very well not produce enough value to cash out for a happy meal.

So will you FOMO or not? The coice is up to you…

Proof of stake (POS) cryptocurrencies

HODL your Proof-of-Stake (PoS) coins to validate, and earn crypto by PoS coins.The PoS concept is straightforward and easy for anyone with a laptop to do as opposed to buying the mining hardware you can find in your typical bitcoin mining farm.

PoS coins are also interesting because there is a growing trend in cryptocurrency market towards PoS coins. Even Bitcoin’s impending Lightning Network upgrade seems to forebode a PoS-like system, even though the main Bitcoin chain will continue to rely on PoW.

Proof-of-Stake is a much newer proposed methodology for achieving distributed consensus. The viability of network’s relying on PoS are not achieved by mining but rather by staking. Staking, simply put, is just when users hold their PoS-compatibile cryptocurrencies in a specialized staking wallet.

Staking achieves the same effect of mining (distributed consensus) without the need for expending exorbitant amounts of computing power and energy.

And if you “stake” your coins, you’ll be rewarded with crypto payouts on a rolling basis just as if you were a mining “winning” a block.

 

I was introduced to this concept by staking NEO (The Chosen One).

NEO

NEO is interersting because it uses something called a delegated Byzantine Fault Tolerance (dBFT). Disregard how confusing that might sound at first glance, and just think of dBFT as kind of like an optimized Proof-of-Stake system.

 

Lisk

Like NEO, Lisk uses a different kind of PoS. Lisk’s distributed consensus methodology is called delegated Proof-of-Stake, or DPoS for short.

This means that while staking is possible with Lisk, it’s only possible for the top 101 “delegates,” with these delegates being voted on and agreed to on a rolling basis by the community.

So, not everyone can stake with Lisk. You’ll need to crack the top 101 delegates for that. But the project still uses an incredibly interesting PoS model.

And with Lisk being akin to Ethereum but built atop the programming language JavaScript instead of Solidity, its potential impending mainstream use could have its dPoS system getting increasingly popular in the years ahead.

Stratis

Stratis is a C#-based crypto project that mined its first PoS block earlier this year in May.

As the Stratis team declared triumphantly at the time:

“This is the first documented and tested instance of a Proof-of-Stake blockchain block mined in C#. Now the developers will combine the full node with the wallet layer developed for Breeze, our full node with PoS will then be ready for a test release in approximately a week from now.”

PIVX

PIVX is a project that forked off of the DASH blockchain last year and has, unlike DASH, fully transition to the PoS distributed consensus system.

PIVX holders have the perk of not having any minimum or maximum cap for staking, too, so you can stake any amount of coins you would like to. To this end, they take the opposite approach to Lisk: anyone and everyone can stake.

Stakers get an annual return of around ~4.8 percent with PIVX.

OKCash

OKCash is an older cryptocurrency project, having been started back in 2014. They’re one of the “OGs” of PoS, as it were, and the project is orientated toward being a micro-transactions throughway.

They’ve got a pretty impressive annual staking return of around ~10 percent. That’s among the best annual returns you’ll find among any PoS coin right now.

All you’d need to do is move your requisite OKCash into a specialized staking wallet.

Many projects are already moving toward PoS, even though it’s a distributed consensus methodology that still hasn’t been widely tested at present.

ETHEREUM

If Ethereum’s shift to Proof-of-Stake goes off without a hitch and proves successful, the dynamic of PoS coins having a small overall sliver of the top 100 cryptocurrencies by market cap in contrast to PoW coins should forever change, to the extent that that “sliver” should become something larger.

ETH’s so-called “Casper” update is what will initiate the crypto’s evolution to PoS. Once this is completed, ETH holders will be able to stake their funds for recurring “dividends” of ether.

Right now, it’s definitely not set in stone how many ether will be required to stake. Indeed, there has been several numbers casually thrown around the community in recent weeks, but to be clear: nothing’s official yet.

Some of these numbers have been as high as needing 1,000 ETH to stake. Some projections are as low as 10 ETH. Another number you hear a lot is 32.

But don’t worry if you’re not an ether whale. Eventually you should be able to pitch in even small amounts of ether into staking pools to partake in the new model.

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